About Special Interest Groups (SIGs)

What is a UXPA Special Interest Group?

UXPA Special Interest Groups (SIG) offer people with the same topic interests a place to come together to share their experience and to encourage each other. SIG's provide a convenient network for everyday access to people with shared interests to combine their knowledge

List of Special Interest Groups

A Platform for Networking

One of the greatest resources for professional and personal development is to meet with colleagues in the same field. You gain new information on state-of-the-art technology, access to others' experiences and knowledge and you will get the chance to broaden your insights. SIGs can provide activities that connect user experience professionals with each other. The SIGs may offer meetings with invited speakers, usability lab tours and roundtables locally and online discussions where interesting usability problems can be solved jointly.

Professional Development

Your meetings and activities allow you to expand your knowledge in user experience. Special Interest Groups bring continuous education opportunities closer to home and provide a bridge between the annual UXPA conferences. It is also possible to organize Mentor Programs as a way for the members to grow in their profession.

Exchange of Services and Contributing to UXPA as an Organization

UXPA SIGs offer the possibilities of exchanging both professional experiences and services, such as reviewing each other's papers and conference contributions. It will also act as a greenhouse for new ideas that can be implemented globally by the Association, and provide UXPA with potential new members to the Board of Directors.

A Creative and Stimulating Environment

Design contests and brain-storming exercises are fun and stimulating ways of learning more about usability and the other members of the Special Interest Group. Special Interest Groups often organize activities such as usability lab tours and site visits to interesting work places, for example air traffic control centers and high-tech manufacturing plants. Learning more about usability issues in these "extreme" working conditions will often give you good ideas to bring back home.